Week 160 – A one-act scene at the urgent care clinic

EXT. OF URGENT CARE CLINIC ENTRANCE IN THE
PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Towering Douglas Firs footed with salal
contrast with the landscaped and manicured
surrounds of a new-ish medical facility.

The parking lot is empty.

A beat-up station wagon drives up and parks.

A woman in her late 40's exits the driver's
door wearing concern on her face.

She opens the passenger door behind her and
a child about eight years old climbs out,
sniffly from crying.

Fresh blood is caked on their right eyelid
and there is a mark on their nose.

She takes the child's hand and they walk
towards the entrance.

	HEATHER
	The good news is that there's
	no one else here, kiddo, so we
	won't have to wait long.
	
	CHILD
	My eye hurts.
	
	HEATHER
	I know. I'm sorry. 

They enter the building.

INT.

The intake area has two admitting desks and
they approach the one directly in front of
them and sit down.

The woman at the desk has a crisp manner.

	WOMAN AT DESK
	Hi. How can I help you?
	
	HEATHER
	This kiddo got jabbed in the eye
	with a plastic pipe. Besides the
	cuts, I wanted get their eye
	checked.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	Okay. Are you the mother?
	
	HEATHER
	Yes.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	What's their name?
	
	HEATHER
	[Child's full name].
	
	CHILD
	I go by [diminutive of name].
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	(Smiling and typing into a
	computer) What's their birthday?
	
Heather starts to answer but is interrupted.

	CHILD
	[Birthday].
	
	WOMAN BEHIND DESK
	Okay. Do you have
	their insurance card?
	
Heather fumbles in her large purse for her
wallet, digs it and the insurance card out,
and hands it over.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	(Takes card and types into
	computer) Are you the primary on
	the account?
	
	HEATHER
	Yes.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	(Typing) Do you still work at
	[corporate company name]?
	
	HEATHER
	Yes.
	
	CHILD
	No you don't!
	
	HEATHER
	(Leans in close to child and in
	a lowered voice) I know, but I
	do. It's complicated. I'll explain
	later.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	(Typing) Are you still at [local
	address]?
	
	HEATHER
	Yes.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	(Stops typing and looks slightly
	puzzled) Are you [Heather's ex's
	name]?
	
	HEATHER
	No. That's...their other mother.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	Oh, okay. So what's your name?
	
	HEATHER
	Heather [lastname].
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	(Typing) What's your social
	security number?
	
	HEATHER
	[Social security number].
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	(After typing it in, she looks
	more puzzled) I have another
	name for that. (Pauses) Um,
	[Heather's deadname]?
	
A beat goes by in silence.	

	HEATHER
	That was me. I changed my
	name.

Another beat goes by.

	WOMAN AT DESK
	Oh.
	
	HEATHER
	Yes, he doesn't exist any more.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	(Resumes typing) Oh, okay.
	I'll just change that now
	so you won't have to if you
	come in again.
	
	HEATHER
	Thank you.
	
	CHILD
	My eye hurts.
	
	HEATHER
	I know. We're almost done and
	then we'll go back and they'll
	check you out.
	
	WOMAN AT DESK
	Okay. (She hands back the
	insurance card and holds out
	an identification bracelet)
	Does all this look correct?
	
The child grabs bracelet and studies it
intently.
	
The woman behind the desk and Heather
share a smile.

	CHILD
	I think my name is spelled right.
	
	HEATHER
	Yes, that's right.
	
The woman behind the desk takes the bracelet
back and snaps it around the child's wrist.

	WOMAN BEHIND DESK
	Okay, head down the hall
	(gesturing) and take a seat
	and they'll call you.
	
	HEATHER
	Thank you! (To child) Let's
	go get you checked out.
	
Heather and the child get up, she takes the
child's hand, and they walk down the hallway
out of sight.

		THE END
		-------
Advertisements

About cistotrans

A Seattle-area trans woman seeking a happy spot to stay at along the path of transition.
This entry was posted in family, healthcare, observations, personal history, transgender and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Week 160 – A one-act scene at the urgent care clinic

  1. loveonastick says:

    TOTALLY LOVING THAT RECEPTIONIST!!!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Connie Dee Ingalls says:

    Part of transitioning is the chore of getting all of the IDs to match. The time and effort is worth it, if only for the avoidance of those awkward moments. I did get a chuckle from your child’s innocent “outing” of you, though. Our children often take our transitions in stride – at least better than we do ourselves. Things like that are so much more complicated to us sometimes because we make them so, while pure honesty comes easily to a child.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. CisWifeLife says:

    The act of kindness is so simple but incredibly meaningful.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Connie Dee Ingalls says:

    Oh gosh, I forgot to ask how your child is doing. OK, I hope.

    Liked by 1 person

    • cistotrans says:

      Oh, thanks for asking! They’re fine. 🙂 A couple of steri-strips on the eyelid was all they needed.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Connie Dee Ingalls says:

        Good news! I had assumed so, but this is a reminder that, as a trans woman, I should be careful not to make assumptions when I am sensitive sometimes to the assumptions of others. I think that should be called transitioning away from “It’s all about Me!” 🙂

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s